Week 3 EDET 636

What will you have to know and do to begin your research?

There are several things a person must know before beginning their classroom research. The first thing is the topic. Merriam advises when choosing a topic, the first place we look at is our daily lives, whether it’s our workplace, family, friends, or community (page 73). A place that raises curiosity, a place where something has happened that puzzles you, or a place where you wonder why it is, the way it is. Initially, your research topic naturally comes from observing something, and asking questions about our everyday lives (Merriam, 75). For me it’s in my classroom, and in my classroom, we use ClassDojo all day, everyday.

The next part a person has to know before beginning their research is the problem. You cannot start a research study without identifying the problem first. “ A problem is anything that perplexes and challenges the mind so that it makes belief uncertain,” (Merriam, 76). I automatically thought about how my students’ behavior, mood, or persistence changes when they don’t earn points like everyone else. According to an article written by Ronald Chenail (page 1716-17), you want to write a sentence or two explaining your curiosity and relevance of the topic and why it’s worthy to study. This allows you to begin addressing the purpose statement right away.

After you’ve identified and chosen the problem, you want to give your readers a background on your topic. This is where you research and find out what has already been done on your topic, what studies already show, and what are the key concepts in your study. This is sometimes called the “Background of the Problem,” (page 79).

Once you have acknowledged the background information, you can write your purpose statement (Merriam, 77). Your question is usually “the gap” in your topic. It’s what is unknown or what hasn’t been researched. You would pose your statement as, “The purpose of this study is to…” (page 77).

After the purpose statement is addressed, you follow by asking a set of “research questions.” The research questions are like subtopics, or your body in a paper. Merriam suggests 3 or 4 questions a decent amount (page 78). These questions usually determine how data will be collected. Chenail uses the “who, what, when, where, why, and how” questions because they pose as open-ended questions.

Next, you introduce your problem. The problem statement is short and is a summary of the introductory section (Merriam, 79). There are three factors in the problem statement (page 79): 1. The context of the study, or the topic and question 2. The gap in the study- what we don’t know and will address in our research 3. Stating the significance of the problem.

Choosing a topic, creating a purpose statement, posing research questions, and introducing the problem statement are things we need to understand and know, to begin our classroom research study.

References:

Merriam, S., & Merriam, S. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

The Qualitative Report Volume 16 Number 6 November 2011 1713-1730 http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR16-6/chenail.pdf

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Week 3 EDET 636

  1. Genevieve- It was easy to follow and I like how you list the steps to take. This sentence really sums it up that you wrote, “Choosing a topic, creating a purpose statement, posing research questions, and introducing the problem statement are things we need to understand and know, to begin our classroom research study.” Do you have the book? I was trying to look where the steps are that you got so I can use those when I get started. I have the kindle version. I think the page numbers are different. I maybe have to get the book as well. I got this because I was already behind and needed the book right away. I usually would rather have a book instead. Nice Job!

    Like

  2. Tristan

    I like how you clearly explained each step in order of what to do. It definitely helps having a clear cut list going into this research project, it makes for no guessing. I like how you give a short summary explanation after each step to explain exactly what to do. This will definitely be helpful for you and the rest of us as we get going these next few weeks. Thanks for sharing what you have found.

    Like

  3. Your description of what you need to do before beginning your classroom reseach was very clear and concise. I also like your problem, “how my students’ behavior, mood, or persistence changes when they don’t earn points like everyone else”. This is a struggle I constantly witness in my classroom. Our school district is implementing CHAMPS which requires three positive interactions to every negative interaction. For the class as a whole this is very doable, but for some students this poses a challenge. I a wondering if this similar to your problem/interest.

    Like

  4. “You cannot start a research study without identifying the problem first.” This has actually been hard for me so far. I know that I want my students to perform better in class, but identifying the actually problem has been difficult because there are many things that could change that. For me to focus only on engagement as my problem really helps me narrow down my research and hopefully gives me a problem that I can effectively research to find a solution.

    Like

  5. I am really interested in what you find out with your research. I use Class Dojo too, but I haven’t had the same issue. That doesn’t mean that I won’t in the future. I wonder if it would help if you told them that you are no longer awarding group points but only individual points. I just don’t know. I could see that making it worse instead of better. Good luck! If I can help, please let me know!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s