Week 10

EDET 678 Week 10 How are electronics viable additions to crafting for today’s young person?

Chibitronics is a “crafty merging of electronics and paper,” according to Hoopes. It combines adhesive stickers with electronic components like LEDs, sensor circuits, and microcontrollers. Chibitronics are “peel-and-stick stickers” (makerspaces.com). You can build circuits without the hassle of soldering, plugging wires, or clips. You use the stickers with conductive, or non-conductive adhesive tape to draw circuits on paper to create artwork.

The difference between conductive adhesive tape and non-conductive adhesive tape is that the conductive tape conducts electricity on both the top and the bottom, so you can make electrical connections just by taping one copper tape to another. The non-conductive tape is only conductive on the top (chibitronics.com). This is the less reliable tape, because taping two pieces together causes lights to flicker or not light up at all.

I would love to use chibitronics in my classroom. I do a lot of art projects with my students, I think including these stickers would make their projects more significant. I know my kindergarteners and first graders would love to showcase their work, other classes would admire them and they would be proud to take them home.

I watched the videos on the Dandelion Painting and “How to Sketch with Electronics,” those videos are inspiring and I think they bring the artwork to life. I was truly inspired. If I’m this excited about it, I know that my students would be.

Resources:

27 Makerspace Materials & Supplies – Makerspaces.com. (2016). Retrieved July 18, 2016, from https://www.makerspaces.com/27-makerspace-materials-supplies/

Getting Started with Copper Tape – chibitronics. (2014, May 09). Retrieved July 18, 2016, from https://chibitronics.com/copper-tape-tutorial/

Hoopes, H. (2014, January 22). Chibitronics connects circuits with stickers for entertaining electronic education. Retrieved July 18, 2016, from http://www.gizmag.com/chibitronics-circuit-stickers/30558/

(2012, November 15). Leah Buechley: How to “sketch” with electronics. Retrieved July 18, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTBp0Z5GPeI

Qi, J. (n.d.). Interactive Light Painting: Pu Gong Ying Tu (Dandelion Painting). Retrieved July 18, 2016, from https://vimeo.com/40904471

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Week 10

  1. Sara Lucas

    Chibitronics would definitely be a good place to start for younger students. I can see students getting into them at all ages but it would be easier for older students to work on more advanced tech like the LilyPad. I love how you say this, “I know my kindergarteners and first graders would love to showcase their work, other classes would admire them and they would be proud to take them home.” From my reading this was the biggest benefit I saw as well. Students create something of their own and some of the more advanced projects can even be incorporated into their daily life. Students take ownership in a new way that they don’t with traditional classroom activities.

    Like

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